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Exploring the Choosing Wisely Campaign: Objectives, Audiences, and Foci

Read through or watch the Choosing Wisely sites listed below and then reply by first a) discussing how these sites represent the campaign’s main objectives and audiences and then, b) brainstorming three more specific area audiences and topics (e.g., diseases, types of tests and procedures) on which our projects might focus.

Overview

Lists of Evidence-Based Recommendations

Consumer Health Campaign Materials

Media Gallery Featuring Providers and Patients

 

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9 Comments

  1. sarahmhudak says:

    a)

    The “About Us” page for the Choosing Wisely campaign represents their objectives in a succinct way. Their main priorities are mentioned right off the bat, marked by bullet points. They then go into some detail about the initiative’s, but the paragraphs are short and simple to understand so that any interested audience, whether the reader is a healthcare provider or a healthcare consumer, can become quickly informed.

    The “Lists” page is filled with links for physicians and patients. The lists provide specific information about questions that must be asked for each aspect of the health industry. The physician lists are titled by the society. The pages express the key points with colored headings that are numbered; each heading has a short paragraph providing some explanation of the issue. Although physicians can handle medical jargon, the page is a fairly simple read, which I think encourages anyone to take the time to learn more about the campaign since its isn’t too strenuous! The patient lists are links to articles that describe key issues that they might encounter and how to appropriately approach them. This language provides an engaging, almost entertainment-style article that encourages a patient to learn more.

    Consumer Health Choices article about links to the “Lists” page and their full list of recommendations. The article provides an informational video, which is much more engaging than reading a long article. The article itself is very short and summarizes the goals of Choosing Wisely in natural, uncomplicated reporting.

    Choosing Wisely’s media gallery is filled with videos that address specific topics in the healthcare industry that are popular right now. Using videos instead of tediously long articles breaks up the flow of information and keeps audience members clicking.

    b)

    Our project could focus on areas such as “Why?” “How?” and “Who?”. I like the idea of using colors, images and videos to break up the typical influx of written information. Using these tactics, we could make the three areas I mentioned more enticing. While Choosing Wisely has done a fairly good job of making their pieces accessible and understandable for the average consumer, I think the campaign sort of misses the emerging adults who will need to start thinking about their own healthcare after college or even as early as after high school graduation!

  2. hgmohan says:

    A: Just as Sarah said, the Overview site gives a brief summary of what Choosing Wisely is really about: specifically, it tells people that we are trying to cut back on unnecessary tests and procedures. I don’t know why they didn’t put the video from the third link onto the Overview page, as it did a great job of explaining Choosing Wisely by relating it to America’s wastefulness. I feel that the list of Evidence-Based Recommendations could be a bit daunting for patients, just because there’s so much. That said, it is easy enough to read, if you could get around to doing it. I think the lists are more for physicians than patients.

    B: I believe the campaign does a good job of making their points about when not to panic about a disease and get unneeded tests. As we mentioned in class, it is getting to the point where patients are under the impression that they can simply order tests from a menu. I think something important to focus on is changing the patient/physician paradigm, by moving away from the notion that a patient “employs” a physician to the idea that physicians and patients are working together to combat disease. Putting both parties on equal footing will allow better communication to take place, the trust between doctors and patients will increase, and evidence-based medicine will be better received. We can’t just dive headlong into this idea of evidence-based medicine, when America has been practicing defensive medicine for years. The mindset of patients has to change first. .

  3. kprashad says:

    a) In the overview, there is summary of the main points and objectives. It also mentions that it seeks to inform the patients, who are the audience. In the lists page, there are different resources that provide information for the patients. Overall, each site tries to convey the message of informing patients so that they can make wise choices when making medical decisions themselves. The choosing wisely page has the same information along with methods and collaborators on the page. The final site shows different videos with commentary from different participants in Choosing Wisely.
    b)
    c) The campaign conveys a message of not overreacting and making smart decisions. Patients should understand the mutual trust between them and the physicians. Communicating effectively between both of them is effective to ensuring that a patient can get the best possible treatment or advice. Patients should also understand that doctors are trying to give their patients the best possible treatment possible.

  4. kprashad says:

    a) In the overview, there is summary of the main points and objectives. It also mentions that it seeks to inform the patients, who are the audience. In the lists page, there are different resources that provide information for the patients. Overall, each site tries to convey the message of informing patients so that they can make wise choices when making medical decisions themselves. The choosing wisely page has the same information along with methods and collaborators on the page. The final site shows different videos with commentary from different participants in Choosing Wisely.
    b)The campaign conveys a message of not overreacting and making smart decisions. Patients should understand the mutual trust between them and the physicians. Communicating effectively between both of them is effective to ensuring that a patient can get the best possible treatment or advice. Patients should also understand that doctors are trying to give their patients the best possible treatment possible.

  5. igoldfarb says:

    A) The “About Us/Overview” page gives a very brief and to the point summary of the Choosing Wisely campaign and their goals. It lists the goals they have to influence patient care and how they wish to do it. They then state the main thing that their program is about; which is making 5 question sheets that detail what is NECESSARY in certain situations, while at the same time listing what tests and medicines are excessive and unnecessary. Besides for specific diagnoses such as allergies or congestive heart failure, there are also lists regarding specific specialties such as Pediatrics and Oncology. They then go on to list all of their partners in this project and the role that each partner plays in the big picture.

    The “list” section is the core of the project that Choosing Wisely is working on. They are trying to cut spending and unnecessary tests that are ordered every single day by doctors. In this section they have a list for most of the specialties in the medical community. Each speciality has a list of the 5 most common things that are overly prescribed or done in excess that are unnecessary. Their goal is to get every patient to read these lists before they go see a doctor of that specialty. The list section also has lists of commonly prescribed procedures and tests. They describe what the procedure is, and most importantly when you REALLY need it and when you really don’t. If you fall under the category of not needing the procedure than it explains safe alternative options that are sometimes just as effective and much cheaper than the prescribed tests.

    The Consumer Health website has the lists of the different procedures. It has a brief overview of the Choosing Wisely campaign as well as a brief video. In the overview it explains their companies involvement in the program and why they feel it is important. The webpage also has a large amount of links to different websites that are all related to the choosing wisely campaign as well as links to their other partners.

    The Media Gallery has the same information that was enclosed in the lists but presents it in a video. This is beneficial to attract younger patients who may not want to sit down and read a large PDF file about their illness but instead watch a video with an expert in the field explaining them what needs to be done and what they can skip over. Younger people love to save money so this may be a key demographic for the campaign.

    B) As I previously stated I think no matter what our campaign should be geared towards patients that are of college age or at least 30 or under. Younger people especially in this era love to save money. With health costs as high as they are today Choosing Wisely should focus their campaign towards this demographic. I know we have no budget but if we were to have some celebrity endorsement in our campaign that would really get patients under 30’s attention. We should definitely make sure that we use social media as much as possible and possibly include posters/handouts/flyers in college campus health centers. That is a great place to connect with people are age who are sick seeing doctors, getting allergy shots or even getting tests done in the radiology laboratory.

  6. tamarabwi32 says:

    a) These links accomplish two things consistently in their presentation: they highlight the problem of healthcare “waste” and that it should be reduced and they are to the point and organized simply enough to appeal and be understood by a broad spectrum of readers. The lists act a an excellent rhetoric for allowing people to see the impact (scope and number) on practices the campaign is having and allowing the patients to educate themselves and what constitutes a test or treatment that may not be necessary. Videos document the main objectives in a format that is very visual and immediate in its effect upon its audience, which is narrowed to patients and providers who are seeking additional information about this campaign.

    b) When I was reading though some of the treatments a few about childbirth made me think we could do a focus on avoiding excessive use of painkillers in combination with contraction inducing drugs, as this increases the risk to the baby and the chance that a Cesarean will become necessary. Also a focus in the general area of over prescribing antibiotics (beyond the range of sinus infections) would be great, particularly when it concerns educating patients. Finally, reducing the prescriptions for narcotics for minor surgeries and instances of reported pain to reduce the risk of drug problems in patients as well as being aware of all the side effects and hazards of using narcotic painkillers. My family has a history of becoming very sick on these kind of pain medications so I learned early on that upping the aspirin instead is better for my body.

  7. kgardner1130 says:

    a) On the Overview site, the Choosing Wisely Campaign lists its objectives and why it has set out on this initiative. This allows potential patients to see the importance of becoming educated about their health care. The List site provides links to all the Lists created by physicians in various specialties which provide tips on how to talk to their provider. It also presents links to Consumer Reports articles on various health issues. This page is aimed primarily at health care consumers. The Consumer Reports page explains their involvement with the campaign and links to the page with the list of links previously discussed. Finally, the video page provides more information on the campaign for those audiences who are more inclined to pay attention to short video clips rather than read text. All the sites emphasize the campaign’s goals to provide health care that is in the best interest of the patient and that eliminates wasteful procedures.

    b) I agree with Ian on targeting consumers under 30. This is an audience with which we are most familiar. Additionally, with new healthcare reform, it will be more important for young adults to understand and be knowledgeable about their health. To target this audience, we would need to use outlets that they are most familiar with such as social media. Some specific health issues relevant to this age group could include STDs and testing, the appropriate use of antibiotics, or the use of Pap tests and HPV vaccines.

  8. ryanmarracino says:

    A. The overview page of the Choosing Wisely campaign is very direct and concise. It states the goals first in bullet point form, and then immediately provides a way for potential audiences to engage in the campaign by challenging them to make a list of five tests or procedures whose necessity should be questioned. It then goes on to further explain the origin and purpose of the campaign giving the campaign credibility.
    The Lists page consists of responses to the campaign and includes the lists of five tests that could be given a second look from many different organizations. This page helps to give further credibility to the campaign, and also helps to advertise the campaign to other health organizations.
    The consumer health choices page describes the campaign in a very general sense in a very similar way as the about page of the choosing wisely website. It also includes an informative video which can be more appealing to a potential audience.
    B. I think something our campaign could focus on that the choosing wisely campaign could articulate much better is the balance of power that is expected between doctors and patients. I also agree that we could specifically reach a younger audience.

  9. pmgomezg says:

    A. the different pages cover the main goals of the Choosing Wisely campaign by answering the main questions of any persuasive appeal. What? Why? and How? The overview page very succinctly but effectively explains what the campaign is and its major goals. The media page shows videos that not only explain why this campaign is necessary but also explains certain instances with people as examples to make it more real and to make people relate to the goal of the campaign more. And finally the lists page that shows the five things patients should ask as well as tips for common health problems shows the consumer as well as doctors how this can be accomplished.
    B. I do agree with everyone else with the idea that a younger audience should be reached as well, however I don’t know if this would be plausible because most younger people, especially college aged people don’t go to the doctor as often as they should be, thus not having the opportunity to “choose wisely” plus younger people have less health concerns and health issues to go to the doctor with.
    The only way I could really think of that would fit nicely into this demographic would have to do with something like sports injuries. Answer questions like like when is it necessary to take X-rays for injuries, or what kind of imaging is necessary if any for injuries like a torn ACL, torn ankle ligaments, tennis elbow, broken bones, and how extensive the imaging should be? Something about concussions and their treatment? Maybe even take information from all the different specialty sites and combining them to be more relevant for the younger age group.

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